Citing Working Papers

2 Apr

Public versions of working papers are increasingly the norm. So are citations to them. But there are four concerns with citing working papers:

  1. Peer review: Peer review improves the quality of papers, but often enough it doesn’t catch serious, basic issues. Thus, a lack of peer review is not as serious a problem as is often claimed.
  2. Versioning: Which version did you cite? Often, there is no canonical versioning system. The best we have is tracking which conference was the paper presented at. This is not good enough.
  3. Availability: Can I check the paper, code, and data for a version? Often enough, the answer is no.

The solution to the latter two is to increase transparency through the entire pipeline. For instance, people can check how my paper with Ken has evolved on Github, including any coding errors that have been fixed between versions. (Admittedly, the commit messages can be improved. Better commit messages—plus descriptions—can make it easier to track changes across versions.)

The first point doesn’t quite deserve addressing in that the current system draws an optimistic line on the quality of published papers. Peer review ought not to end when a paper is published in a journal. If we accept that, then all concerns flagged by peers and non-peers can be addressed in various commits or responses to issues and appropriately credited.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.